Who is most affected?

Table of Contents

A historic loss of learning was reported this week, showing the impact of virtual learning during the pandemic. Nearly 500,000 fourth- and eighth-graders took the statewide tests, and while no state saw an increase in test scores, black and Latino students were hit the hardest. California’s 2022 Smarter Balanced assessments from tests administered in the spring of 2022 showed a decline in English language arts. and testing math scores. Results for Northern California school districts showed declines from 2.91% to 8.18%.| MORE | Here you can find test results for various schools and districts across California. The main finding is that there was a significant loss of learning. While every district in the state has seen declines, experts say that even though students are individual, not everyone is equally affected.” Kids who tend to perform better have more resources outside of school. “When it comes to standardized test scores, we can predict a student’s test scores fairly accurately by looking at the source of the resources they have at home,” said Jacob Hibel, co. -Director of the Center for Research on Poverty and Inequality at UC Davis. Who was most affected? In Sacramento County, test scores among economically disadvantaged youth during the 2021-22 academic school year for ELA decreased to 32.18% compared to 37.08% during the 2018-19 school year. In math, 20.35% met or exceeded the math standard during the 2021-22 school year, down from 26.80% in 2018-19.” This disproportionately affected Hispanic, Latino, and African-American students, including many of our English language learners who they were affected even more during the pandemic,” said Manuel Buenrostro, associate director of Policy at Californians Together. In Galt, schools with faster declines also have higher populations of economically disadvantaged students. % of the 3,500 students are economically disadvantaged. According to Department of Education data, the latest test scores show the Galt Joint Union Elementary School District saw a 3.14 percent drop in ELA and a 5.46 percent drop in math test scores. Yount said funding will be important to sustaining after-school education Buenrostro adds that the impact of learning loss is a double-edged sword among English learners, and he said leaders should target investments toward students who need it most to achieve educational equity. The school district is actively working to expand educational opportunities for students after school and focuses on small group instruction for acceleration and intervention. They are also adding professional learning communities for teachers and support staff. However, additional funding is needed. “In order to keep the additional staff we’ve hired, we’re going to need the state to continue at the funding level we’re at now,” Yount said.

A historic loss of learning was reported this week, showing the impact of virtual learning during the pandemic. Nearly 500,000 fourth- and eighth-graders took the statewide tests, and while no state saw an increase in test scores, black and Latino students were hit the hardest.

California’s Smarter Balanced 2022 ratings from spring 2022 tests showed a decline Testing English Arts and Math Scores.

Results for school districts in Northern California showed a drop from 2.91% to 8.18%.

| MORE | Here you can find test results for various schools and districts in California

The main finding is that there was a significant loss of learning.

While every district in the state has seen declines, experts say that while students are individual, not all are affected equally.

“Kids who tend to perform higher have more resources outside of school. When it comes to standardized test scores, we can predict students’ test scores fairly accurately by looking at the source of resources they have at home,” said Jacob Hibel, co-director of the Center for poverty and inequality research at UC Davis.

Who was hit the hardest?

In Sacramento County, test scores among economically disadvantaged youth during the 2021-22 academic school year for ELA decreased to 32.18% compared to 37.08% during the 2018-19 school year. In math, 20.35% met or exceeded the math standard during the 2021-22 school year, down from 26.80% in 2018-19.

“It has disproportionately affected Hispanic, Latino and African-American students, including many of our English language learners, who have been impacted even more during the pandemic,” said Manuel Buenrostro, associate director of policy at Californians Together.

In Galt, schools that declined at a higher rate also have higher populations of economically disadvantaged students.

“Our higher poverty schools have seen more loss,” said Lois Yount, superintendent of the Galt Joint Union Elementary School District, which is 63 percent Hispanic and 62 percent of its 3,500 students are economically disadvantaged.

According to Department of Education data, the latest test scores show the Galt Joint Union Elementary School District saw a 3.14 percent drop in ELA and a 5.46 percent drop in math test scores.

Yount said the funding will be important to maintaining after-school opportunities as well as professional learning opportunities for teachers and support staff.

Adding that the impact of learning loss is a double-edged sword among English learners, Buenrostro said leaders should target investments to students who need it most to achieve educational equity.

The school district is actively working to expand educational opportunities for students after school and focuses on small group instruction for acceleration and intervention. They are also adding professional learning communities for teachers and support staff.

But additional funding is needed.

“In order to keep the additional staff we’ve hired, we’re going to need the state to continue at the level of funding we’re at now,” Yount said.

Source

Leave a Comment