Cowboys Jerry Jones addresses photo in which he is part of a group of white students blocking black students

‘I had no idea what we were doing’: Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones speaks out about a controversial photo of him among a group of white teenagers barring African-American students from their Arkansas high school in 1957 denied

Jerry Jones, owner of the Dallas Cowboys, has addressed a controversial photo of him recently discovered by the Washington Post.

In the photo, Jones can be seen standing in a group of white students, trying to stop six African-American students from entering and integrating into the school.

After the Thanksgiving Day game against the Giants, Jones commented on the photo, saying, “That was 65 years ago. I had no idea when I walked upstairs what we were doing. It just reminds me how to improve things and do things the right way.”

Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones further elaborated on the controversial photo discovered of him in a group of white students blocking a group of African-American students from entering and integrating North Little Rock High School in Arkansas.

Rebellious white students at North Little Rock High School in Arkansas barred the doors of the school and, on September 9, 1957, denied access to six African-American students.  Moments later, the African-American students were pushed down a flight of stairs and onto the sidewalk, where city police broke up the altercation.  CIRCLED: 14-year-old Jerry Jones

Rebellious white students at North Little Rock High School in Arkansas barred the doors of the school and, on September 9, 1957, denied access to six African-American students. Moments later, the African-American students were pushed down a flight of stairs and onto the sidewalk, where city police broke up the altercation. CIRCLED: 14-year-old Jerry Jones

Jones had previously admitted it was him in the 1957 photo, saying “I don’t know that I or anyone else expected or had any background to know … what was involved,” he said. “It was more of a curious thing.”

In the photo, Jones is clearly watching from behind an older group of students and whether he played any further role in the incident is unknown.

What is known is that not all of the students in the crowd were there for the sole purpose of curiosity.

As one black student, Richard Lindsey, explained, a white student put his hand behind his neck as he announced to the crowd, “I want to see how a ***** feels.”

The new enrollees decided not to attend the school.

This view, taken from the doors of North Little Rock High School, shows students rushing to stop six African-American boys from trying to attend the first day of class, September 9, 1957. The children had previously enrolled at the school.  At the door, white students blocked the entrance and managed to drive back the black students.

This view, taken from the doors of North Little Rock High School, shows students rushing to stop six African-American boys from trying to attend the first day of class, September 9, 1957. The children had previously enrolled at the school. At the door, white students blocked the entrance and managed to drive back the black students.

Jones hasn’t been very vocal about racial issues since buying the Cowboys in 1989, unlike many of his co-owners over the years.

He has also expressed questionable views on issues in the competition related to racing in the past.

Jones voiced objections to the NFL’s Rooney rule, which requires teams to interview at least one candidate from an outside minority for top positions, and he has never hired a black head coach or head manager.

Jones did object to protests during the 2017 NFL season, when many African-American players took to their knees to raise awareness of racist police practices.  He finally knelt with his entire team in September 2017 (pictured) in a choreographed demonstration that took place while the national anthem was not playing

Jones did object to protests during the 2017 NFL season, when many African-American players took to their knees to raise awareness of racist police practices. He finally knelt with his entire team in September 2017 (pictured) in a choreographed demonstration that took place while the national anthem was not playing

The Cowboy’s owner also objected to protests during the 2017 NFL season, when many African-American players took to their knees to raise awareness of racist police practices.

He finally knelt with his entire team in September 2017 in a choreographed demonstration that took place while the national anthem was not playing.

“Our players wanted to make a statement about unity and we wanted to make a statement about equality,” Jones said at a press conference after the game.

“They were well aware that statements made or attempted in and as part of the recognition of our flag could lead to not only criticism but also controversy.

“It was very easy for everyone in our organization to see that the message of unity, the message of equality, if you will, was pushed aside or weakened by the controversy.”

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